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CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 12:00pm EST
programs that serve the needs of our work force and our economy. and finally, reform that recognizes the need for safety and security on our boarder and in our communities. with democrats and republicans recognizing the moral, economic and political imperative to create a 21st century immigration process, the 113th congress marks the best opportunity for broad immigration reform in nearly a decade. but for legislation to pass, it will take leadership. leadership from the administration, from congress and from faith, law enforcement or and business leaders at all levels. in each case the leadership that is needed must be strategic, disciplined and unified. our speakers today are exactly that; streej i disciplined and unified. our unity of purpose comes from the common crisis facing families and businesses in our midst and cuts across professional sectors, geographic regions, political stripes and religious beliefs. our consensus lies in a common belief that all americans prosper when we welcome immigrants and empower them to participate fully in our society. we have a broad, a range o
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 6:00am EST
society like ours where we're supposedly such a strong economy, how can science correct this issue? because without cracking this issue i think having an illiterate society, a scientific illiterate society that affects the market demand for the science to come about. my friends who are not that scientifically aware, they just want a faster phone and want more pictures on facebook and they want a faster internet connection. what they don't want is a unified theory of physics. they don't want more nasa funding or anything about life. how this -- can science alone fix this problem or is it a bigger problem to society itself? >> huge issue. >> science can't fix big problems like that. they can help but i think the best thing scientists can do is make it more interesting in grades before imagination and creativity have crashed. largely -- 90% of the people educated -- that's what i never took a course in english at the university because i feared the deadening effect of the conventional view of literature. i'm glad i did it. i took the examination. >> it worked out pretty well for you.
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 8:30pm EST
and can drive productivity throughout the entire economy, the two we're focused on are what we call the power platform, the energy grid needs to be redone, and the knowledge platform. we don't -- we need to do some work on the networks, which is to say broadband, but it's really about how do we apply it? how do we deliver band width that can change education, change health care, change all government services, we get faster, cheaper, better, the same phenomenon on our phones and in our networks, we want to see in public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy? >> guest: depends on a variety of different uses. for example in medicine, we're now moving to a place where we can have wireless sensors improve medicine and that's great. but business uses and other thing things, cameras, geneomic medicine, there's faster networks, president clinton was was dell and he said we can't expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access the speed of korea, and he is absolutely righ
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:15pm EST
fortunes were created. think about where we are today. what was the colonial economy? these are all drugs. .. and now we have turkish coffee, english tea time and of course of the fortunes that drove a lot in the european development. and so, long story short the reason have the world got colonized in some ways is because a bunch of old white men in europe couldn't get up so there you have sex, drugs and international relations but i tell the story because what we consider drugs is important so when the white males of european ancestry that drafted this 1961 convention got to read some of their favorite drugs that they got accustomed to policy, alcohol, you know, all these things they love to do. but coca was something indigenous people used and is the attitude that made them say this is forbidden, this causes degeneration, this is terrible stuff. but coca in its natural form is a very beneficial and relatively harmless. it's a very mild stimulus in my opinion and my personal experience two cups of coffee basically, so this thing that's hard to get across people in the united states
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 5:00pm EST
also from the gulf we recognize that healthy echo systems also can mean healthy economies. and from louisiana what we have taken, what we believe is a very good first effort in addressing both the vulnerability that exist with the state's master plan has which is is a long-term plan addressing the ecological but reducing the risk across the coast. we believe we can achieve a 100-year protection for the community it's the resources that important. the ecological resource that's state provides and the gulf provides to the nation that if it's going to be afforded through the nation it has to provide protection to those communities who provide that. we believe that this plan we can have sustainable long-term healthy echo systems but also healthy communities and economies. there's an essence a form of what we call social engineering. if you can't ensure the communities, the supermarkets, the schools the things that community depend on, they will not survive. we want to make sure that we're developing both a healthy echo logical system but -- we have gone a long way in first attempt. it's
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 12:00pm EST
large budget deficits is because the economy collapse. and in classic washington fashion, this is the case with the schoolhouse is on fire and rather than focusing on putting the fire out, everyone in washington runs out to use as much water. the budget deficit is the economy right now. that's the to 50 minute like that but that's the truth. i think it would be great if an organization with strength and integrity of a or b. would stand up and make the point because we're having an entire budget that is basically premised on something that is not true. >> i agree with you. we do have underlying pieces of our economy that need to get fixed. but massive change in spending and we've already cut a trillion dollars over all in spending. we've cut medicare as part of the political their act. we have to be really careful and just solving these problems by cutting spending. .. >> we do it in a way that supports families and the population that we have. >> let me just add to that. i agree with you, but unfortunately, most of the people on social security will be on fixed budgets. and so the
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 3:30pm EST
average inflation in the economy. so what you did is, number one, you had a supreme court ruling that it was in the best interest of the country to take away the liberty of individuals. the congress had actually gone outside of the enumerated powers which list very specifically what the congress can do and yet the supreme court held out the abandoned enumerated powers. also, the trumping of the tenth amendment. wind -- >> net comes to the commerce clause, you use that with the supreme court justice and a testimony. you reprint that testimony. your back and forth. what was the question you asked her about fruits and vegetables? >> well, could the government tell you, mandy to you how many fruits and vegetables you eat it a. it really arises. where is the role with the government in terms of our lives? can come in fact, the commerce clause be viewed so widely as what was done in full burn versus the united states? can it be interpreted so widely that we could eventually get to the point where we can mandate will we are doing? we're doing right now. the new rules from the united sta
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 7:00pm EST
shaping the post-world war ii economy and society. it was called the committee for economic development and it was a place where the leaders could hammer out their differences on economic issues. it was the inventor of modern consumer research and a kodak executive. most of the titans of industry understood this. one of their agendas was, but i got this in publication, get those boys off the farm. they wanted to create an acute labor pool for industry. since there were 6.8 million farmers and 54% of the population lived in rural areas. immediately after the formation, they started mapping out a postwar program to grant industrial and financial interest in more control over producing and selling food. they had a number of agenda besides commodities and cheap labor. today we have only 16% of the population that lives in rural areas. these leaders wanted to reduce the rural population. when you go back and read the material, you can understand why. because farmers have been on economic roller coaster ride, and they were the backbone of the populist movement after the civil war. farmers wer
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 6:00pm EST
lincoln was holding his cards close in this impending civil war fdr did the same crisis in the economy before he was inaugurated and nobody knew what he was going to do and people said that they should have sent signals. it would have helped the country but it seems like it helped them do a better job waiting. we've two of them for president now and the fiscal crisis and the war going on and everybody is wondering what is going to happen. what advice would you give to mccain or obama of the should do once they are elective or should they wait until they are inaugurated to say what they are going to do? >> the question is if i could repeat, another excellent question. the parallel between lincoln and fdr not doing anything in the four months that they faced the real crisis as compared to the crisis the next president will inevitably face and whether he should be involved. i will say quickly as daniel weinberg knows one of the inspirations for the book was jonathan alter's book on clinton's roosevelt first 100 days with strong sections on the president-elect and i still remember vividly
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 3:00pm EST
very powerful role in shaping the post-world war ii economy and society. it was called the committee for economic development, and it was a place where the leaders of business could hammer out their differences on economic issues and use new techniques of public relations to promote their agreed-upon agenda. and among the founders were the president of studebaker, the inventer of modern consumer research and polling and an eastman kodak executive. and most of the titans of industry joined the ced in the 1940s. it represented industry banks, railroads, grain traders and other corporate interests, and one of their agendas was -- and i got this quote from some of their publications -- quote, get those boys off the farm, end of quote. they wanted to create a really cheap labor pool for industry, because in 1935, for instance, there were 6.8 million farmers and 54% of the population lived in rural areas. so immediately after its formation, they started mapping out a program to grant industrial and financial interests more control over producing and selling food. and they had another agend
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:30am EST
the american bowl. this is pretty much how whittaker chambers felt. and he became economy is because he had come to believe that the america she by its exclusively commercial habits, capitalism, nor did come had reached the end of its tether. and that communism was the only alternative on offer with the vision and the power to save whatever might be worth salvaging out of a dying civilization. yet, when he finally discovered that the evils of communism were infinitely greater than those he attributed to capitalism, he did not, thereby, come to the conclusion that he been wrong about america. america under capitalism remained in his idea a society die of its own soullessness, which is why he could say that in breaking with communism he was leaving the winning side for the losing side. but he was leaving the side of evil for the side of good. and this is also why witnessed showed among the greatest books ever written about communism, is i'm afraid a little help as a guide to what conservatism can or should be without anti-communism. for neither in witnessed nor in later years t
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 11:15am EST
one of which are fdr out of office and demanded his visit nation economy was recovering? on way back to the french and indian war. the young george washington was writing romantic letters to a woman who was not mrs. washington. name is sally fairfax, an attractive, older sophisticated neighbor. what if washington's letters have become public during the french and indian war for the revolutionary war, much as petraeus is enough to team public and what we got rid george washington? bill clinton is not the first and the worst. and there, done that, a long history of it. it pains me to say even abraham lincoln visited a. say it isn't so, but it happened. the details on matters itchy. there's not a lot of letters written about this, but lincoln's best friend was joshua speed and speed was perhaps as dashing and from unlucky with the ladies as lincoln was homely and awkward unlucky in romance. they always called one another by their last names. speed, lincoln. speed and that is linking his door and didn't have a place to stay, so what can let speed stay upstairs at the general store. durin
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 12:00pm EST
investment? are you benefiting from that? is there enough tax generated in the economy to offset that? and would disaster occurs are you on the hook for off infrastructure and everything else that may be required to rebuild that community? and asia return on that exposure -- is your return greater? as a taxpayer, the answer is unfortunately too often know. we have subsidize risks to the point where as long as no extreme event occurs, it seems okay. but when the extreme event occurs, you are now exposed to much greater costs without necessary generating revenue or other societal benefits off that risk. now, during the '70s and '80s and through the early '90s, went a lot of growth was taking place in coastal areas and other vulnerable areas, very few storms were occurring. frequency was down. so the allusion was i have lived here for 30 years, this never happens. welcome the problem with climate whether it's 30 year cycles are like an eyelash in understanding how big systems and dynamics work. not talking at any of the forcing issues, and now we find ourselves in this period of inc
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 7:00am EST
work and pumped $10 billion into the economy. and then once again harry became one of the most visible members of the roosevelt administration and the new deal. he was on the cover of "time" magazine twice. he hung out with the kennedys and the hairy men's and others. in 1938-1939 with the president encouragement, i have notes on this, harry began promoting himself as a presidential candidate, looking to the election in 1940. the president gave encouraging and at least a farm in iowa, of course. but his hopes were dashed in hundreds of newspapers began reporting the story about a comment that he allegedly made to a friend at the racetrack, which did not put the administration in a good light, a comment attributed to him was, we shall tax and tax, spend and spend. whether true or not of course he denied it. it stuck with him for the rest of his life, and it became a rallying cry for those who hated the roosevelt and the new deal. and if that wasn't enough, in september 1939 when the war broke out in europe, harry found himself back at the mayo clinic. and the doctors had ruled o
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 12:00pm EST
promotion from college or university. and that is why we are seeing everywhere in the economy. it is not just the universities. >> you right of of a powerful few have deceived and dominated the new talk consistently about howard's optimism which was a beacon. how do sway the optimism he had about politics and breaking through and people having better lives for themselves and this kind of pattern he saw of people either being depressed or coopted. >> it is that easy. like howard, i am a temperamental optimist. but if robbie had won the election a think i would probably have given up, meaning a would have given up on the american people. but what howard kept saying, and he proved right again late kept saying change and the a battista change will rise in the most unpredictable ways at the most unpredictable times. it is quite true that most of the worker strikes that have taken place throughout american history have failed. but some of them have succeeded, and there was one, a powerful union movement. something like 11 or 12% of workers are unionized, but there are signs of their revers
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 12:00pm EST
justice ginsburg, but she had suggested that we have a uniform rule of economy gent circumstances. that, her suggestion complies with your objection. >> well, if i'm understanding it correctly, i think our point is this, which is that the police officers have to act reasonably in the situation. in the situation they know for sure the evidence is going to be lost, they know that every minute is critical, for example -- >> so many situations in which we require a warrant, nevertheless. when there's drug dealing in a house, every time -- it's almost a certainty that they're going to use the drugs, and that evidence is going to disappear. you rely on knowing that there's likely to be telltale signs left over. and that's the same thing you do in an alcohol situation. you rely on the testimony of the police officer, you rely on the implied consent presumption. it's not as if this is destruction of all evidence. and not like a fleeing situation where someone gets away, you have nothing left. this is vastly different. >> i mean, with respect we disagree. this evidence is critical, and the
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 7:00am EST
that international business people can get in and do the business that helps our economy? >> sure, there's a number of initiatives underway to facilitate better visa issuance, if you will, trying to be more welcoming for both business and tourism, and those are things that are taking part, obviously, in different areas of the government. one thing we're doing in tsa is trying to develop international known and trusted traveler programs that we can recognize. so, for example, we've taken the first step with our friends to the north. canada has a known trusted traveler program called nexus. they have 530,000 citizens who are in the program, and so we have accepted them as part of tsa precheck also. mexico has a program, sentry, we're working with the mexican authorities to try to recognize that known and trusted population. so there's a number of initiatives underway that would help promote not only people coming to the u.s., but also u.s. citizens traveling internationally because right now tsa precheck is just a domestic program. what we're working with internationally is for thos
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 9:00am EST
. however one defines a knowledge economy today, it could not have emerged and is not worth sustaining without the production and distribution of books, journals and other professional content. it goes without saying that wherever there is publishing, there is copyright. senator kenneth keating once called copyright the jugular of the book--publishing industry. -- book-publishing industry. now, when maria said that earlier this year, i thought i've got to use that, i have to attribute it, of course -- [laughter] to her, and i certainly would not do otherwise. but it seems to me to sum up very much what i have heard since i sort of walked into this position at the aap three years ago. there are a lot of publishers who, frankly, care a hot more about making -- a lot more about making books than they do about making money. but in this climate and given the structure of the industry, there has to be a return. finish and one of the, one of the big six, one of the ceos of the big six did say to me i gamble with other people's money. that's particularly true of the trade sector, the consumer
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 8:00pm EST
given where both parties are. >> they are going with the american economy and the global economy. closer you get to the fiscal cliff, i think the less likely it is that the u.s. will be funded over and. >> okay, let me ask about tax reform. mutual political last week that a balanced approach to placing the sequester with benefits and revenues should accelerate tax reform, and i believe it's fully possible this year we work on a bipartisan basis. how does that square with the people that say that the tax reform is going to lose out because of scheduling and needing to deal with the debt ceiling and the looming sequester and house republicans concerned that if they do anything on tax reform, that they may leave themselves open to the senate not taking action. therefore, they have taken in on popular vote for no reason. >> first of all we have to solve this debt crisis in terms of sequestration and in terms of the full faith and credit of the u.s. and. we are not going to accomplish tax reform in the next six weeks. so we have a deadline that cannot basically be moved for what we need to do
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 9:00am EST
and growing our economy, we can keep the sales tax flat at its current level and cut income taxes on our lower income working families to 1.9% and drop the top rate to 3.5%. this glide path to zero will not cut funding for schools, higher education or essential safety net programs. and for those who come to kansas or stay in kansas because of lower taxes, let me tell you, opportunities abound. an all-time record of more than 15,000 new businesses formed in 2012, a sign of strong economic growth. we are, as you know, the air capital of the world. our aircraft industry is back on the ascent, and southwest airlines is soon to land in wichita. we are the nation's breadbasket and its meat counter and are becoming its dairy section as well. our oil production is hitting a high not seen in more than a decade with billions of dollars of a new vertical and horizontal drilling. we are number one in new wind investment with nearly $3 billion of new investment last year alone and more to come. our rapidly growing animal health sector that stretches from k-state in manhattan to johnson county gra
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 8:00am EST
entire economy. and the two we're really focused on are what we call the power platform, the energy grid needs to be redone, and the knowledge platform. we don't -- we need to do some work on the networks of what we call knowledge, which is to say broadband, but it's really about how do we apply it, how do we deliver bandwidth that can really change education, change health care, change all government services so we get faster, cheaper, better? the same kind of phenomenon that we see on our phones and our or networks we want to see if public goods and services like education and health care. >> host: well, as a former executive director of the national broadband plan, mr. levin, how important is speed when it comes to improving our economy, in your view? >> guest: well, it depends on a variety of different uses. for example, in medicine we're now moving to a place where we can have wire lessen sores really improve medicine, and that's great. but if we want to do degnomic medicine, we need a much faster network. bill clinton, the former president, was saying we can't really expect our bus
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 8:00am EST
money that's already taxed to the united states will boost our economy and allow us to create jobs here and maybe could be tie intoed creating an infrastructure bank, but we need some fundamental changes. belief it or not we care more than anything else about the health of the economy, so deficit reduction is really big for us. we support the simpson-bowles, we're the only association that does. it hurts etch, it's shared sacrifice, it's painful even for us but we need stability in our finances as a country, and every responsible business should stand up and say that, and we're urging both sides -- republicans and democrats -- to recognize the pain has to be spread around. there's some things, patent controls that effects innovation. basically, people don't produce anything but lawyers. it's not really a good way to get a society. and from the smallest start-up to the biggest economy everyone's saying we need more certainty, you shouldn't be putting people out of work in actively-of run companies if they're don't even think they're breaking someone's patent. there has to be some ce
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 9:00am EST
sidetracked economy. so the president has an incentive to come to the table and tried to get the issue under control. and you have the republicans issue which part of the republican dna, fiscal responsibility, balanced budgets, trying to get the deficit under control. most of the people have been elected in the last few years have been elected basically on the fiscal policy agenda coming out of a coming out of the tea party initiative. so that you have an identity of interest. the question really becomes the politics of getting people to go across the aisle to reach agreement. and i don't think the house can do it very honestly. because the fact so many seats in house now are gerrymandered by party. and the one thing that happens in those districts, about 65% of the house is now gerrymandered by party, when you're elected your elected by the base. you win the primary you are the congressperson. the one thing you can't do with your base is compromised. that's the one thing the base won't tolerate, on both sides. you can't govern because govern requires compromise. you can't go across th
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 5:00pm EST
the economy although we've alluded to this aspect to it let me ask you to take off your journalist hat and put on your markets have and ask a simple question is venezuela going to buy, sell or hold? >> i think what we are going to see in the short term is a great deal of turmoil to reverse of markets -- capital flees some certainty. so, right now you have on uncertainty because nobody knows what's going to happen. nobody knows that he's alive or dead or on life support although we did hear from his brother yesterday that he is not in a coma. we thought he was either in a, or on life support. now we know he is not. other really insightful information we've gotten from the regime or that he's in a stationary situation. i have no idea what that means. that is a stationary situation. >> his treatment was being assimilated. they are still using that, his treatment is being assimilated. so we haven't really had any insight into whether chavez is going to make it or not. the prospects are probably that he is not. we thought that the regime or the government would call elections sooner rat
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 7:30am EST
fast thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on small and medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large and small are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that is why we should be fighting in europe for a more flexible europe and a europe where we see regulations come off. but the view of the party opposite is sit back, do nothing and never listen to the british people or british business either. >> order! >> here on c-span2 we'll leave the british house of commons now as today move on to other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's question time aired live wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern while parliament's in session. you can see this week's question time again sunday night at 9 eastern and pacific on c-span. and or for more information go to c-span.org and click on c
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 11:00pm EST
happen in one fell through to get our economy in great shape and move towards a balanced budget. it started out for three phases. started off with president bush's actions. first president bush in terms of taxation before president clinton took office in the action the president took in 94 and 97. well, we think there is a third phase here they consider country on a path that will allow us to get our debt to gdp, deficit to gdp down around 3%, which is all economists are training center greer that areas we can begin to cruise the country and as my grandfather used to say that the grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, we may very well be able to meet the goal we set out to do, which is to have roughly $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and put us on that past. i didn't come here to talk about any of this important subjects today because as important as they all are today we have a mortgage and indie media call and that is how to do with the epidemic of gun violence in america. the one of the statistics
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 8:00pm EST
fell swoop to get our economy in great shape and move toward a balanced bump started off with three phases. started with president bush's actions, the first president bush, in terms of taxation, before president clinton took office. then the actions the president took in '94 and then in '97. well, we think there's a third phase here that can set our country on a path that will allow us to get our debt, the gdp, our deficit to gdp, down around 3%, which is the basis of which all economists left, right, center, agree, are the areas which we really can begin to grow as a country. and also my grandfather used to say, with the grace of god and good will of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, that we may very well be able to meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over ten years, and in the long-term deficit and put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today because, as important as they all are, today we have a more urgent and immediate ca
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2013 7:00am EST
, their economy in the toilet, the national debt crisis had devastated the economy in mexico, and my mother came back to be a single mother of father without my father's support so she changed a lot, and she, you know, she was bitter about the whole experience in the u.s., and she was broken hearted, and i think in many ways, we paid the price for what my father did to her because she was no longer interested in being our mother. you know, she was interested in finding someone else to could protect her, who could take care of herring and who, i guess, repair the damage, you know, that my father had done. this is what happened to my mother, and i understand that in many ways, and back then, obviously, i didn't because i was the daughter seeing her mother drift from her mother and more each day. >> host: reyna, you mentioned you got the green card and ran with it. where did you go to school? where did you study? >> how did you become an award winning novelist and now in non-fiction? >> guest: when i got the green card, i made a promise to myself i was going to go to school and be someb
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 6:00pm EST
building bridges, cutting to promote the new market economy which expanded opportunities of a self-made man and historian persuasively argued his passion and commitment to internal improvements was given strength by his conviction that all men should receive a full and increasing award for their labour so they might have the opportunity to rise in life and all these public works would give them more of that opportunity. lincoln hoped it was fair to be known as a reference to the new york governor hugh white and the opportunities for all new yorkers and that the permanent imprint on the state through his success in getting the legislature to support the canal. but the stars turned against him in 1937 when a sustained recession hit the state bringing the expensive and the unfinished projects under attack as the economy continued to slide bill legislature called a halt to the project and the state fell into bankruptcy as one of the major proponents of the project lincoln received a major share of the blame the she managed to win a fourth term in the legislature in 1940 he pulled the least
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2013 1:25am EST
have. if you did not grow the economy at all, a white reporter self in that position? the fed has increased its balance sheet they printed $2 trillion worth of phony many and ultimately the pain will fall on the middle-class and the very core. it is the most -- both parties say they want even if it means we lose our seat reporters cells first instead of the country. it is not hard any citizen if they read back in black there is common-sense ways to save money. just this last week the air force announced this year we spend $64 billion on miti projects 64 billion said gao says half of that will be wasted. it will never be completed. and back in black the city ought to cancel this because it will never work. this is out inefficient government is. finally the air force canceled the spent another 100 million first. they paid the settlement fee to cancel of $8 million. but the person responsible did not get fired and not held accountable. those that did not provide the service got their money back. nobody runs their household that way. most state governments operate the we are incompete
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 6:00am EST
to react to it. now, when you consider the impact of drought in the economy, in some nations in africa it has been up to 9% of the gdp of the nation's. for instance, in zimbabwe or even in kenya. so when you consider all this, i think more need to be done for preparedness and for early action. unfortunately the question is why is it the information on early, early warning, i think it's because first, drought is not a kind of charismatic disaster. it's not like tsunami or earthquake. it has little subterranean impact. second, we're experiencing more frequent drought. we are reluctant to take action on early warning because maybe they're concerned about taking action and being found wrong. so uncertainty is something that scientists alike. i think my third point also might be that one might say why should we act so early? we may undermine the capacity of committee. so when you put all these together, you may have some reasons why early warning is not leading to early action. >> thanks for the question. this issue crosses pretty much everything we are going to hear. why you said th
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 2:00pm EST
asian flu of 1998, and the crash of the russian economy at that time. and suddenly he was out of the banking business. the bank went broke. and so he was in the oil business, and so he made a go of the oil business. what followed was absolutely remarkable, but the point is he was free about all these hang-ups about how you've got to respect the oil. he was, in fact, very western. that was his creed, and that's how he went after it, and he brought in westerners to help him do that and doubled oil production. but the problem is that he was a rebel on every front, and in particular he defied the president which was a very unwise thing to do. and so he ended up in a confrontation, in a blood match with vladimir putin whom he regarded with contempt. he consistently underestimated putin. and i'll give you a little episode that became famous as the symbolic turning point of which knowledgeable people in moscow as soon as they heard of this episode realized that he was -- well, if not doomed, he was going to lose. of in february of 2003, so this is eight months before his arrest, putin summo
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 9:00pm EST
different economies, different modes of production, very different religious values and different histories, a very different outlook on things. when they came together, i think that the 55 people who gathered in philadelphia had most of them, not all of them, most of them had an imperative that they were going to create something like a representative democracy or republic of all of these different elements, and they have almost everything but that and they can with a whole lot of different ideas about what they were going to do. and nobody came away with exactly what they wanted. most people didn't come away with anything close to what they wanted except that a very remarkable thing. >> host: these are very polarized times. the congress and the 79 piece is as polarized as today in your book if we think the media is polarized or in tents today and we haven't seen anything with compared to then. so how were they able to compromise than in the similarly polarized times it is hard to compromise that. >> guest: they didn't like it any better than we like it, and they got as mad. some
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 5:00pm EST
you get economies of scale going it will increase the cost of the gun ten to 20%. >> i work here at the school for public health. i just had a comment about the large capacity magazines. i was in a discussion with some friends of mine who are law abiding gun enthusiasts about the large capacity magazines and they said you can ban the 40 round magazines, but they said if i wanted to kill a lot of people i could just have 310 round magazines i could pop onto my weapon. i saw some of the logic of what they were saying to the i guess my comment and my question would be it's a little hard for me to feel like we can make reasonable decent progress in reducing gun deaths when we live in a country where someone so many people think it is fair the constitutionally given right to own a machine that fires projectiles designed to kill large numbers of people. how are we going to make qualitative progress when we have so many people in such a large lobbying industry for the gun manufacturers that support that idea? thank you. >> a fi in the first comment. we are already making progress because t
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 7:00pm EST
supply, that you bring in some put mental hay for livestock because that is a big part of the economy here. and what has happened over the years is essentially there is only so much hay and water you can haul. pretty soon people had to do something with their livestock and they were in such poor condition that by the time they realized that over 30,000 cattle died. allotted times drought mitigation plans will decline for two or three years so we have to think about the way we plan for droughts in what we do. >> there are two more questions right there. this one i want to go to roger. do you think that we will be seeing mega-droughts taking place in more parts of the country and then we are going to hit back on a policy question. >> the answer to that is most likely, but the reason why it is most likely because it happened in the past. during the years 900 to 12 or 1300 we had extended periods of drought in the colorado basin, anywhere from 60 to 100 years in the record. when we have an increasing temperature it does not necessarily cause a drought, but it exacerbates the conditions re
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 10:00pm EST
head of the wpa put a .5 million people back to work and pumped $10 billion into the economy. and then, once again, harry became one of the most visible members of the roosevelt administration and the new deal. he was on the cover of "time" magazine twice. he hung out with the kennedys and the harriman and this quote. and then, in 1838, 1939 but the president's encouragement. i have not done this. here he began promoting himself as a presidential candidate, looking to the election in 1940. the president did encourage him and he leased a farm in iowa a coors, but his hopes were dashed when hundreds of newspapers began reporting the story of a comments he allegedly made to a friend at the racetrack, which did not put the administration and the good life. the comment attributed to him was we shall tax and tax, spend and spend and elect any left. whether true or not, of course he denied it come is stuck with him the rest of his slaves and became a rallying cry for those who heeded this about in new deal. and if that wasn't enough, if cameron 1839, when moore broke in europe, harry found hi
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 10:00am EST
jobs initiatives and argues that it hurts the economy. this is about 40 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm vice president for policy research at the ma
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 8:30am EST
the health of our neighborhoods and our economy. it's about the health of our schools, and our school children, and our communities and the health of our neighbors. mayor bloomberg, the people of new york have seen is an effective, results oriented mayor, one of the most effective results oriented mayors ever to serve new york, or dare i say, any city. creating jobs, expanding opportunity, improving city schools, launching america's largest affordable housing initiative. quite honestly, everything they do in new york and said to be the largest initiative, but i should say also largest and one of the most innovative affordable housing initiatives. and also fighting crime. really showing us that the people of new york have shown the people of baltimore that it is possible to make a safer tomorrow, that we do not have to resign ourselves to the circumstances of the way things have always been, or what we have never been able to do in the past. and, in fact, we can save lives, and each life is precious. each life is important, and if you save just one life, it is as if you have sav
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 8:00pm EST
southern economy. and only slave labor, on the labor of people owned outright by their owners, the landowners who had no right to object much less to refuse the condition under which they were compelled to work. only slave labor would cultivate those crops internationally and cheaply enough to yield the tremendous profits that they did. but slavery importance to the southern e letted was not simply a matter of dollars and cents. to many masters, as slave owners liked to be called, slavery appeared to be con essential even in irreplaceable fixture of society. it was imseparateble from e everything they knew and loved. it was inseparateble from all aspects what they referred to as their way of life. of course, economically but also socially and culturally. slavery was the unique basis of the particular outlook, assumption umg, the norm, the habits, the relationships to which these masters had become deeply attached. it defined their privileges, it shaped their culture, it shaped their religion, it even shaped their individual personalities. so slavery was essential to southern life.
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 9:00am EST
they're holding a forum on jobs, innovation and the economy. >> it's my pleasure to welcome you here to the brookings institution on a soggy day. it's not too hard to come in from outside on a day like this. this is the fifth growth through innovation forum that we have held at brookings but i'll give you a little background in a minute. it's the third one that we are conducting publicly. the phrase growth through innovation is an important part of the vocabulary to at brookings. we have what we call for institutional priorities under which we try to cluster all of the work that are more than 100 scholars do here. those for priorities are energy and climate, opportunity and well being, managing global change, and growth through innovation. this is i think exactly the right moment to be having today's event. we are in a period of transition in our national leadership here in the capital, of course. we have a new treasury secretary, chief of staff coming in. we'll be having a new commerce secretary, labor secretary, and, of course, the 113th congress is settling in on capitol hill. the
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 9:00am EST
of one, 1.5% visual, quite significant drag on economy. at the same time with quite a bit to do to address our long-term sustainability issues. a lot more work to do, let me be very clear about that. but it's going to be a long haul. it's not going to happen overnight. basically because the government budget represents the values and priorities of the public, and decisions been made about what to spend on, what you tax and so on are very difficult and contentious decisions that will take some time to address. >> well, those is to use -- those issues of course are not the specific purdy of the fed, and so why do we shift gears and talk more specifically about some things that the fed is doing and things that the fed might do. perhaps a way to introduce that is to say that the fed of course is keeping interest rates at close to zero since roughly 2008, and it dug pretty deep into its arsenal, more recently in terms of in particular the very massive asset purchases recently launched its third round, which are intended to bring long-term interest rates. can you tell us how well you thi
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2013 11:15am EST
book, "regulating to disaster: how green jobs are damaging america's economy." in it, she subjects the assumption and policies which led to such a faded federal investments as solyndra solar panel manufacture as was that a 123 collector car battery manufacture to a waiting analysis which we of the institute have come to expect from this oxford trained economist who served as chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her book, she helps us understand why the failures of such direct investments in private firms are both significant problems in themselves and cautionary tales for those who would have the government rather than private investors allocate capital. the publication that regulates the disaster caps diane mr. shear as an institute senior fellow, i'll year in which has been prolific and influential. cited by reuters reporters, talk show host, across the country. i think in particular of her many, many contributions to our series called issues 2012, ranging from her analysis demonstrating that even adjust
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2013 11:00pm EST
creating more monetary policy support for the economy. >> you had mentioned that there has been evidence that the longer-term interest rates have come down to the initial round. concern is that the unemployment rate remains very high and activity would try to bring that down and one would hope to see additional movements from the most recent round. are you suggesting that one would need to be patient? needs a little bit more about how you would assess how this is having the kind of effect that you would anticipate? >> well, we will be doing that on a regular basis. we will be looking at the impact on financial markets and we will see some effect there. we will look to see whether or not the labor market situation. we first started talking about a .1% on employment, there has been some movement. there was nearly 40% of the unemployed having been out of work for six months or more. that is a situation where there are too many people i can give you specific criteria except to say that we will be assessing the impact of our actions a financial market conditions and looking to see ho
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2013 11:00pm EST
exciting ideas that can lead to the next waves in the economy. the other one is the political environment -- sorry. it can be hard to ignore, but were going to do it. another piece of the political environment, where we had the ability to fix the situation. we know to fix this. we needed a comprehensive dead deal that's big enough to stabilize the debt and we'll remember that. when you're trying to balance the budget. were not very. were not going to be there soon. you have to make sure that that's not faster than the economy and it's on a downward path and the problem is so big or too calm% year to look at every part of the budget. you have to look at defense spending. you have to clearly focused on health care costs, which go faster than the economy. we have to fix our social security system, which makes promises bigger than what we can pay out on the road. we have to raise revenues. we started down the path, but we haven't looked had to do about overhauling tax system, which would you want to raise revenue, you could do in could do in the way bad for the economy hallway dis
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2013 8:00pm EST
sense of its politics and economics and society, mexico has the 13th largest economy in the world today. $1.16 trillion. the oecd predicts in 2042, when regeneration, mexico will have his archer economy than germany's. this is not me. this is the oecd project enough things being equal. therefore notwithstanding the inequality that exists in mexico that has to be dealt with and will be dealt with over time, the fact of the matter is that texaco socially is becoming more and more middle-class society and that is reflect to and every one of the usual measures. demographically, lifestyle, in terms of fertility rate, number of students in university, quality of the housing. all of these trends have brought mexico to the point where it is becoming predominately of middle-class society and will continue to move in that direction. and third, mexico lyrically speaking is a functioning democracy. not perfect, nor is our democracy perfect. but when you look at their electoral system, if you look at the way in which freedom of the press has been moved into mexico with passion, he began to see
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2013 4:45pm EST
of money. then you can start to diversify the economy. i've seen these villages that under u.s. policy with constant conflict, and security to a more of the same, rents, leather, repeat, like shoveling water and is completely ineffective. now i go back to some of the same towns and their flourishing the economies of diversifying because these farmers now have some food security, some predictability and they're able to invest a little bit of money if they have an experience cooking, it will open a little restaurant or hotel or car repair shop or whenever, and that is a you get the economies of coca. it is like the recession here in the united states. as long as people are insecure in don't know what tomorrow will bring it will hunker down, they will not take risks, invest, and diversify. >> i would just like to congratulate our three speakers. what he considers myself to follow this issue closely. at some interesting insights tonight. i learned a congratulate you for your provocative and effective presentation. i want to make two points in addition to that, and that is to bolivi
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 5:00pm EST
, growthing -- growing faster than the economy. we have to fix the social security system making promises that are bigger than which we can pay out down the road. .. but he recognizes the threat it putouts there in the economy in that you can't possibly imagine the real growth coming without a sense of stability. the with coming from knowing what these changes will be so you could have planning investments, job creation, all the necessary pieces of moving the economy forward. the big wild card is when people are going to make these tough choices instead of using them to fight in the normal political boxes. what is going to happen next? it's on a different path than i would have thought. if you think about the prospect theory which basically says when you're delivering good news you want to do it in lots of little pieces if they got a promotion than you want to tell them they got a raise and then tell them they got a bigger office. each piece of big news is good and makes people happier. if you were doing bad use and waiting for an airline that is going to be delayed. i think it really app
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2013 8:00pm EST
year 2014. map 21 allows us to continue to improve the way the move freight that fuels our economy. map 21 streamlines and consolidates programs and map 21 helps to shorten project delivery a priority for president obama and congress. when we deliver projects faster, when we deliver their benefits faster. like enhancing safety, less congestion and a cleaner environment. the project delivery improvement included in map 21 based on an innovative -- innovation initiative known as everyday counts. they took it from you, victor. you've done a great job with every day that counts. let's hear it for decter menendez and what he has done and what his team has done. thank you, victor. [applause] the concept behind everyday counts is the same as this year's thp. better, faster and smarter. finally map 21 helps us keep our transportation system safe. this law gives the department for the first time oversight over transit safety. again, a big thanks goes to peter rogoff. in the train crash your and 10, peter and i decided that we would commit ourselves to getting the department of transportatio
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2013 9:00pm EST
explores what it mean for the global economy. it's a little under an hour. >> it's a pleasure to see you here tonight. as we know, happiness is relative thing. i began the day this morning in the dentist's chair having a crown put in, and here by tonight i'm at politics and prose. i'm a happy man. having gone from one extreme to another. it's a special pleasure to welcome you here tonight. and standing room only. this is marvelous. i thought i would begin by telling you a few stories about what the book is about, and skipping the big structure and simply tell you some stories about some of the people in the book. in the end it's very much about real people. so what kind of book is this? it's big, it's heavy, it's, you know, you may open it with a certain trip dedication. what it is is a memoir, first of all. it's a little bit of a memoir of my travels in russia. it's a memoir of the number of the people in the weak. we have gone through twenty years together. it's a memoir of the last twenty years since the soviet union fell apart. it's a history of the oil industry and but in par pa
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